1. Pingback: A Gourmantic Affair with Twitter – Part 1: Seduction | Gourmantic

  2. What a great three-part post!  Thanks for the shoutout there and I think your ground rules that you established are great!  Looking forward to tweeting with you AND keeping up with your blog!

    • Mardi: Thank you for your kind comment. My ground rules are working well for now and it pleases me that I have finally found a way to make Twitter enjoyable.
      As do I! :)

  3. Ok, this post totally cracked me up. I had similar issues with Twitter in the beginning and was forced into some of the same conclusions. Our relationship is okay at best, but like you, I am working on tweeting within my comfort levels -and Tweetdeck and a time limit are essential for me too!

    • Shannon: Your comment makes me feel better that I’m not the only one who struggled with it initially. The comfort level you mention is crucial to my enjoyment. I can understand how people get addicted and luckily, I have escaped.
      Tweetdeck is my favourite out of other tools, be it on the laptop or the iPhone. Such a time saver!

  4. Great post. Tweetdeck is a must I agree.  Twitter takes a lot of work and now that we are on the road full time, we don’t have the time to dedicate to it.  We have fallen out of the loop a bit even if we try to tweet posts.  It is because of what you said about giving tweets a personality. When we were at home, we could tweet with personality and build relationships, now we are tweeting quickly and without personality and noticing a drop.  Twitter is fabulous, but man, it is time consuming. Super advice!

    • Dave and Deb: I couldn’t imagine tweeting to the same extent while travelling. During my last trip, I tweeted updates and highlights of the holiday, and I found even that was a little time consuming. I don’t know how you two manage it!

  5. Insightful series, I enjoyed it very much. I do find Twitter a good source of traffic however, but I think it takes a few good tweets before people come check out your profile or the links you’re posting. Timing tweets for particular times of the day is also a good way to make the most out of each tweet.

    • Anil: Thank you for the kind comment :) I am yet to sing the praises of Twitter as traffic generator. The odd post might get visibility and hence I get more followers but to garner regular readership from Twitter, that has not been my experience.
      I agree on the timing of the tweets. However, it’s difficult to coordinate when readership/followers are scattered around different time zones and one has other commitments. It would be worthwhile if Twitter provided the functionality to set a time or two for certain tweets.

  6. Thought provoking series. Can’t help but sense a little disappointment from it. A lot of effort for little gain?

    • Chris: As I was explaining to a friend recently, it takes a lot of effort on Twitter to get one post noticed then you start all over again. No guarantees, of course. But you have to look at it as a marketing and networking tool and decide if you want to invest the time.

  7. This sums up a lot of what I have found – that the conversion rate isn’t proportional to the effort expended. It almost seems like there is an active reluctance amongst tweet followers to follow links… even if it’s just to an image on Flickr.  I can’t help but wonder if they see it in reverse to me – that looking at web content, images or blogs only subtracts from valuable tweet time.  I much enjoyed your ‘Trilogy of Twitter Terror’. ;)

    • Dave: That’s a good point about seeing it in reverse. I too wonder how many people retweet without even checking an article or a link or a photo. Maybe it’s the aspect of garnering 1000s of followers on Twitter, who knows. I’m not one who gets to play the popularity numbers game.
      I like your ‘Trilogy of Twitter Terror’ title much better than mine. If only this weren’t a comment, I’d retweet it! ;) j/k

  8. Pingback: Social Media and Travel Foodies: Are We Replicating Shameless Self-Promotion | Gourmantic

  9. Pingback: A Gourmantic Affair with Twitter – Part 2: Relations | Gourmantic

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