Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking with Seeds and Grains Workshop

An artisan baker is defined as “a craftsperson who is trained to the highest skill level to, mix, ferment, shape and bake a hand crafted loaf of bread”. And at Brasserie Bread, the artisan bakery and café in Sydney’s Banksmeadow, they know their craft.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Matthew Brock, Brasserie Bread Training Manager

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class

The Artisan Baking with Seeds and Grains Workshop is a three hour hands-on class where participants learn how to make a seeded loaf, shape baguettes and dinner rolls. The workshop includes a tour of Brasserie Bread’s fully operational bakery and ends with a tasting of the various types of organic breads with complimentary wine and cheese.

1. Multigrain Struan

The first part of the class involves making a loaf of Multigrain Struan, a technique simply described as bringing together a soaker, biga and a selection of grains.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Biga

Biga is old fermented dough, made from wholemeal flour and yeast.  It is made by mixing 112g of the bread flour mix (40% Kialla organic stone-ground wholemeal flour, 40% Manildra bakers meal and 20% organic unbleached plain flour), with 1 gram of fresh yeast and approximately 85 grams of water at 21oC.

The ingredients are mixed together to form a dough ball. They are kneaded for 2 minutes, allowed to rest for 5 minutes then kneaded again for 1 minute. The mixture is covered and refrigerated for 8-12 hours.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Top to bottom: Bread flour mix, soaker, biga, fresh yeast, extra virgin olive oil and agave nectar

The soaker is made from 30g of bread flour mix, 85g of grains consisting of soaked sunflower seeds, linseeds, boiled grains and rolled oats, 2g of river salt and 85g of milk.

The other ingredients include 7g of fresh yeast, salt and agave nectar in extra virgin olive oil to impart flavour and fat.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Prepared dough bulk fermenting

To make the final dough, Biga is chopped into 6 small pieces and lightly dusted with flour. The rest of the elements are combined and worked together for 5- minutes. This is a very sticky dough at this stage and it’s important to work the dough by hand and not keep adding flour.

The dough is rested for 5 minutes then kneaded again for 1 minute to strengthen the gluten before it is placed in a bowl, covered and left to bulk ferment for 45 minutes.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Shaping into rolls

Once the dough is ready, it is shaped into a boule and rolled into rolled oats with wholemeal flour and left to proof for 45-60 minutes in a hairnet covered container that will give it its shape. A sharp blade is used to slash the dough before it is baked at 220oC, with an injection of steam for 2-3 seconds before turning down the heat to 180cC and baking for 40-50 minutes.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Rolls baking in the oven

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Baked Multigrain Struan bread

2. Shaping multigrain bread rolls

The second part of the workshop involves more handy work where a piece of prepared dough is shaped into 6 bread rolls.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class

The dough is divided into 6 equal pieces and worked with a little dusting of flour. It is manipulated into a square then  each corner of the dough is brought to the centre like a pork bun.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class

The ball is flipped, then pressed down onto the bench and rolled into a boule that holds its shape. This is a technique that requires a little practice and with time, you get the feel of when the dough will start to lift off the bench and come together into the right shape.

3. Rolling Baguettes à l’ancienne and Pain d’epi

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class

The next hands-on part of the workshop involves turning a piece of dough into a beautiful traditional organic French baguette. Baguette à l’ancienne means it is made according to the old-fashioned manner.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Working the dough

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class

The dough is divided into two equal parts, stretched and rolled and its edged tucked in.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class

The dough is then pinched and brought together into a seam, which forms the weakest part.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class

The second baguette is turned into a pain d’epi, or Wheat Stalk Bread. It is then rolled into a mixture of fennel, sesame, nigella and poppy seeds.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class

Pain d’epi is shaped using scissors. A cut is made, and a piece of dough (still attached) is turned to its side forming the traditional wheat stalk bread shape.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class

The baguette is scored with a sharp scalpel. The bread rolls prepared earlier are given a light dusting of flour before small incisions are made in the top to give them a little shape.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class

The end result is seen in the photo above: my first baguette, six (almost) identical bread rolls and a pain d’epi I can call my own.

4. Photo Tour of the Brasserie Bread Bakery

While the bread is baking, the group is taken on a tour of the bakery while it is in full operation.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Bread going into stone oven

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Garlic bread just out of the oven

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Dough mixing machines

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Clockwise from top: piped pastries, pain au chocolat in the making, croissants left to dry before they are turned into almond croissants the next day, schiacciata or flattened Italian bread.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
In the dough room

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Dough left to proof

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Shaped dough left to rise

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Store room

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Bread to be distributed to customers

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Sourdough for Qantas

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Garlic bread dried by fan

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Brasserie Bread’s signature garlic bread

5. Tastings

The class ends with a degustation of the different types of Brasserie Breads, with a selection of cheeses, Pepe Saya butter and taramasalata. A glass of red or wine wine accompanies the tasting.

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Cheese board

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Fromage des Clarines studded with garlic and thyme, topped with a little white wine and baked in the oven

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
Selection of loaves from Brasserie Bread on taste

Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking Class
More Brasserie Bread on taste

The Seeds and Grains Artisan Baking Workshop is a fun and informative class that runs for three hours. Class size is kept to a maximum of 10 students which ensures hands-on tuition and many opportunities to learn and ask questions. Much like the popular Kids Baking Class, the pace is relaxed and caters for novices as well as those with a little more experience. Matthew Brock ‘s instruction is interactive and professional, making everyone feel at ease with their dough.

The workshop is well-suited to anyone with an interest in bread making, whether it is for an individual, a group of friends or a team bonding exercise. Brasserie Bread run workshops and courses on a regular basis with more information available on their website.

Gourmantic attended the Seeds and Grains Artisan Baking Workshop on Tuesday 30 August 2011 as a media guest of Brasserie Bread. She is no longer afraid of bread making and sticky dough.

Brasserie Bread and Bakery Café
1737 Botany Rd
Banksmeadow
Sydney NSW
www.brasseriebread.com.au

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Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking with Seeds and Grains Workshop was last modified: December 20th, 2015 by Corinne Mossati

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Corinne Mossati

Corinne Mossati is the founder and editor of Gourmantic. An avid scribe, she has taken pen to paper since the age of five. Her repertoire includes long works of fiction, short stories and travelogues. She is a winner of the GT travel writing competition, has judged the Australasian Whisky Awards and several cocktail competitions. She is also named in the Australian Bartender Most Influential List.

18 Comments:

  1. Looks like a lot of fun and a well put together class!

  2. Would love to join the workshop! “@Gourmantic: Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking with Seeds and Grains Workshop fb.me/Mo8qqJhu”

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter.

  3. What a lot of fun! A class, a tour of the bakery and you get to try all their breads – fantastic!!

  4. I’ve read about this class- what an enjoyable way to learn about Artisan Baking

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  7. The pain d’epi is just beautiful.
    So did you knead dough AND take photos at the same time? Talent, right there ;)

    • One hand on the dough, the other on the camera… it was a juggle! Mind you, the poor camera had so much flour over it, next time I’ll use plan B ;)

  8. You would think that living in France I would find these kinds of classes…obviously I have to get out more! These photos are gorgeous and I think I found my new calling in life – making bread! No kidding, this looks like a wonderful experience and the bread looks simply delicious :)

    • You do come out of it thinking you have created something unlike no other. It’s not like other baking because it’s bread and it’s using artisan methods. I’m sure they’d have similar classes in France!

  9. Brasserie Bread Artisan Baking with Seeds and Grains Workshop http://www.gourmantic.com/2011/09/04/brasserie-bread-artisan-baking-with-seeds-and-grains-workshop/ via @gourmantic < photos are terrific #breadmaking

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter.

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